Spotlight on UCA Impact Case Studies

Following on from the previous post providing an anaysis of REF 2014 impact case studies, here’s a spotlight on UCA’s three case studies submitted to REF 2014.

Eco-Design and Eco-Innovation Into Business

Impact type: product sustainability, eco-innovation and design, circular economy

Main beneficiaries: Small & Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) 

Professor Martin Charter has directed The Centre for Sustainable Design ® at UCA since 1999. During this time he has developed a body of research concerning sustainable and eco-innovation, and sustainable and eco-design, with a particular focus on organisational implementation within business. This has led to a widespread programme of dissemination and application to SMEs through funded projects, publications, consultancy and training.

Lost in Lace

Impact type: Economic. Audience Development, Curatorial Innovation

Main beneficiaries: Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery, Crafts Council

Lost in Lace was an exhibition curated by Professor Lesley Millar MBE at the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery (BMAG), between 29 Oct. 2011 and 19 Feb. 2012. The project was presented by BMAG and the Crafts Council (CC) as the inaugural exhibition of the CC biennial Fifty:Fifty partnership programme. An independently commissioned evaluation reports that significant economic impact, audience development and curatorial innovation resulted from this work. BMAG and the CC were the principal beneficiaries of this impact in that the exhibition and its associated programme of activities fulfilled their stated strategic aims and ambitions for the specific project and wider organisational goals.

 

Communities of Practice in Contemporary Craft

Impact type: Curatorial innovation

Main beneficiaries: Craft practitioners

The University for the Creative Arts has a longstanding commitment to the history, practice, and theory of craft. The research of the Crafts Study Centre (CSC) and Anglo-Japanese Textile Research Centre (AJTRC) has long championed the work of craft practitioners in order to find new ways of thinking through creative practice. This curatorial work, public facing in nature, has contributed to the personal, professional and creative development of a range of craft practitioners by offering an enquiry-led platform for the exploration of craft as profession. Though this research has brought numerous benefits to a wide range of people and organisations, this case study explains specific qualitative and quantitative benefits brought to a number of craft practitioners by this work.

 

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