RDP Webinar ‘Impact and Public Engagement in the Arts’ with Charlotte Medland -11th Oct 1.00pm

This webinar will look at public engagement and how to measure impact in arts research. The session will give you an opportunity to consider impact and engagement in your research and what to consider at the start of each project.webinars

Charlotte Medland is the Impact and Evaluation Officer for the Humanities Division at Oxford University and has worked previously on the evaluation of public engagement projects at the University of Southampton.

Interested? – email roffice@ucreative.ac.uk and we will send you your link to join this webinar.
All you need is a computer (or mobile phone) with headphones.

RDP Webinar – 11th October 1.00pm ‘Impact and Public Engagement in the Arts’ with Charlotte Medland

Other forthcoming RDP Webinars can be seen at UCA Research Development  along with links to the recordings of past webinars

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Initial decisions on REF 2021: summary points

 

On 1 September HEFCE published their initial decisions on some high-level aspects of REF 2021. Here’s the summary of the decisions:

Assessment and Scoring 

  • As in REF 2014, REF 2021 will assess the following:
    • outputs – 60% (down from 65%)
    • impact– 25% (up from 20%)
    • environment – 15%
  • The five point scale from unclassified to 4* (world leading) remains the same

Outputs

  • There will be strong support for interdisciplinary research: each sub panel will have at least one appointed member to oversee assessment of  interdisciplinary research (also see environment section below)
  • A Reserve output may be submitted when a publication does not appear in time for the REF submission deadline

Environment

The environment template will be expanded and restructured to include:

  • More quantitative data (details tbc in further guidance)
  • Data on research income, income in kind and research degrees awarded (as in REF 2014)
  • Information on enabling impact
  • Information on supporting collaboration beyond HE
  • Information on structures to support interdisciplinarity
  • Unit’s approach to Open Access/open research
  • Impact template (in REF 2014 this was a standalone template)
  • Support for equality and diversity
  • Institutional level information

A standalone institutional level environment statement will not be included in REF 2021 as recommended by the Stern Review.

Impact

  • Definitions of ‘academic impact’ and ‘wider impact’ will be aligned with the Research Councils’ definitions (both are part of the dual support system)
  • Further guidance will be provided around: ‘reach and significance’ of impact; impact arising from public engagement; impact on teaching, to include impact within, as well as beyond, the submitting institution.
  • Impact must be underpinned by  ‘excellent’ research of at least 2* quality and be produced between 01/01/2000 and 31/12/2020. The impact claimed in the case studies must take place between 01/08/2013 and 31/07/2020
  • The impact case study template will be expanded to include more questions and a section on additional contextual data
  • Cases studies will require “routine provision of audit evidence”, but this will remain confidential and not be given to the panel
  • The number of case studies required is still to be decided. It will possibly be linked to the number of outputs
  • Continuation of case studies from 2014 is allowed, but impact must take place during the REF 2021 assessment period (please see 2nd bullet above)

Please click here to view Initial Decisions on REF 2021 full document.

Initial decisions on REF 2021

Latest news on REF 2021

  • outputs – 60 per cent
  • impact – 25 per cent
  • environment – 15 per cent

Read full details on the initial decisions here:

http://www.hefce.ac.uk/pubs/year/2017/CL,332017/

 

 

Vertigo Ventures Webinar – What does 4* impact evidence look like?

Webinar – Friday, Jul 14 2017 @ 10:00am – 11:00am
What does 4* impact evidence look like?

Vertigo Ventures are running a one-hour intensive session is aimed at supporting those who are developing impact cases for the next REF. Using our experience of working with universities to write impact case studies and analyzing cases for good practice this session will utilize these reflections and learnings to share insight for those currently grappling with impact evidence collection.

To sign up click here

Who should attend?

  • Researchers looking to submit impact case studies
  • REF Managers, Impact Officers, Research Support Officers
  • Heads of academic departments seeking to understand and develop the impact in their departments

The webinar will answer the following questions:

  • What does impact evidence in 4* case studies look like?
  • How is this evidence used effectively?
  • What they difference between panel or impact types?
  • What should researchers and research managers be doing to develop good practice?

Delivered in a convenient and concise format, the presentation will leave you better equipped to identify support evidencing of case studies.

 

 

Impact: Tool Kit for Public Engagement with Research

Visiting the Solent Research Conference recently, we had a session from Southampton University on ‘Public Engagement with Research’.

They have developed a tool kit, which is open to all researchers, based on a three step process. You can check this out here-http://www.southampton.ac.uk/per/2017/evaluation-planning.page

As many art research outputs include engaging with the public, this maybe a useful source of information for planning evaluation and impact of projects.

  • What are you trying to achieve with the project?
  • How should this be measured?
  • What do you need to measure for your funder?
  • How will your work contribute to any required reporting to your funder?
  • Can you measure impact?

The AHRC recommend using a logic model for engagement and evaluation planning, and they use the Kirkpatrick Model for levels of potential impact. You can access an example of the Logic model on the above website in step 1.

You can checkout our recent blog on Impact Case Studies for an example of UCA Public Engagement in Research  – Lost In Lace.

Spotlight on UCA Impact Case Studies

Following on from the previous post providing an anaysis of REF 2014 impact case studies, here’s a spotlight on UCA’s three case studies submitted to REF 2014.

Eco-Design and Eco-Innovation Into Business

Impact type: product sustainability, eco-innovation and design, circular economy

Main beneficiaries: Small & Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) 

Professor Martin Charter has directed The Centre for Sustainable Design ® at UCA since 1999. During this time he has developed a body of research concerning sustainable and eco-innovation, and sustainable and eco-design, with a particular focus on organisational implementation within business. This has led to a widespread programme of dissemination and application to SMEs through funded projects, publications, consultancy and training.

Lost in Lace

Impact type: Economic. Audience Development, Curatorial Innovation

Main beneficiaries: Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery, Crafts Council

Lost in Lace was an exhibition curated by Professor Lesley Millar MBE at the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery (BMAG), between 29 Oct. 2011 and 19 Feb. 2012. The project was presented by BMAG and the Crafts Council (CC) as the inaugural exhibition of the CC biennial Fifty:Fifty partnership programme. An independently commissioned evaluation reports that significant economic impact, audience development and curatorial innovation resulted from this work. BMAG and the CC were the principal beneficiaries of this impact in that the exhibition and its associated programme of activities fulfilled their stated strategic aims and ambitions for the specific project and wider organisational goals.

 

Communities of Practice in Contemporary Craft

Impact type: Curatorial innovation

Main beneficiaries: Craft practitioners

The University for the Creative Arts has a longstanding commitment to the history, practice, and theory of craft. The research of the Crafts Study Centre (CSC) and Anglo-Japanese Textile Research Centre (AJTRC) has long championed the work of craft practitioners in order to find new ways of thinking through creative practice. This curatorial work, public facing in nature, has contributed to the personal, professional and creative development of a range of craft practitioners by offering an enquiry-led platform for the exploration of craft as profession. Though this research has brought numerous benefits to a wide range of people and organisations, this case study explains specific qualitative and quantitative benefits brought to a number of craft practitioners by this work.

 

Insight into Impact in REF 2014

The nature, scale and beneficiaries of research impact, KCL 2015

This post is based on the analysis of the impact case studies submitted to REF 2014, carried out by King’s College London team. Read the full analysis here

Background

REF 2014 was the first exercise to assess the impact of research outside of academia. Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) submitted case studies to REF 2014 which aimed to showcase how research undertaken over the past 20 years had benefited society beyond academia – whether in the UK or globally. The case studies outline the effect on, change or benefit to the economy, society, culture, public policy or services, health, the environment or quality of life that have arisen from research.

Key findings of the analysis
  • Over 85% of REF 2014 impact case studies included multidisciplinary research
  • Case studies were diverse and wide ranging
  • The impact of UK HEIs is global
  • Informing government policy was the largest type of impact across all panels, followed by ‘Parliamentary scrutiny‘ and ‘Technology commercialisation’
  • Interestingly, despite the allowable period for underpinning research stretching back to 1993, the majority of research cited was published since 2008
  • Top beneficiaries of impact from case studies submitted to REF 2014 are companies, students and children.  The top three beneficiaries of impact from the case studies submitted to Panel D (Art & Design: History, Practice and Theory) are students, schools and communities. Click here to see the distribution of all potential beneficiaries of research impact found in REF 2014 case studies.
Potential Beneficiaries of research submitted to Panel D in REF 2014

 

 

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